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  • Sumanta 12:45 PM on December 26, 2014 Permalink |
    Tags: academic, , , mugging, words   

    Mugging up words to increase the IELTS writing score (academic writing) 

    DSC_2778To get a good decent score in IELTS many test takers may choose to mug up huge pool of vocabulary. How effective is that? This author finds it a good thing to do to enrich the performance on IELTS exam´s writing section, however there are certain other things too, to take care of.

    Now the first question that might come to your brain is from where should you learn new words. Those who are going through tests some other tests (besides IELTS) for which a large number of words are generally needed to be memorized will automatically have a huge collection of words. But knowing such a giant list doesn’t mean one knows to articulate the mugged words in correct manner, without undermining the literary flavor of the writing. Generally based on this author’s observation the words people memorise for these type of exams are commonly used in the articles of some of the popular international news medias. While you read those articles simply make a habit of spotting new words and try to see how the writer have used the word. You may wish to copy those sentences for your future reference.

    On the other hand if you don’t require to mug up words for any exam or you simply don’t like the task of memorizing,  simply make a habit of reading quality articles and see the usage of variety of unknown or less known words.

    If you have a very limited time to prepare for IELTS, this author would suggest not to try learning new words much, unless you have an extra sharp memory to learn new stuff in short time and apply it in correctly in sentences. In such scenarios simply use the vocabulary stock you already have with yourself and its probably unwise to underestimate it. Just be careful to avoid excessive repetition of same words or phrases.  If the flow of writing is coherent to the task and have the display of intellectual capabilities in the writing, it should not be difficult to get your preferred scored.

    However, language preparation is grossly subjective and experiences and performances vary from person to person. If after trying your best you are not being able to get your desired score, you should probably seek help of an expert.

    Read in IELTS Section:

    The writing above is a clip of an individualized experience of the author of this article and has no relation with any official IELTS exam or its bodies. Please cross check issues that concern you from various competent authorities dealing with IELTS. This blog shouldn’t be used as a tool to prepare for any exam or test.
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  • Sumanta 10:05 AM on February 16, 2014 Permalink |
    Tags: academic, , , Task2,   

    Tips for IELTS writing task – 2 (academic) 

    Here are few tips that might help you perform better in your task 2 of academic writing in your IELTS test.

    Before you start writing, read the question stem carefully. Take care of the words used in the question. And stick to the facts asked in the question throughout your writing.

    Writing an Introduction:

    Introduce in your own way, try not to make it too large. You may state what are you going to say in the remaining paras like ‘the essay will try to explore the disadvantages of smoking’. Don’t write conclusion type statement here.

    Writing the Body:

    1. Now moving on to the body part of the writing.  You may make one para or multiple depending upon the requirement. If you are asked about advantage and disadvantage of mobile phone, 2 para stating each will be helpful.
    2. Give example, if you are asked to do so. What many of us, including me confuse is the difference between example and logic (a teacher corrected me in this regard). Let me explain – when you are writing about negative sides of mobile phone, a logic you may keep is that talking on this devices along with driving is harmful, but don’t mistake it with an example. An example for this will possibly be something like this- ‘ a friend of mine encountered an accident while driving her car and talking with her boy friend on mobile’.
    3. If you are writing about advantage and disadvantage try to give an example of each.

    Writing  the Conclusion/Summery:

    This is another vital part. Here, you should say your opinion or suggestions, if any. A good attitude statement is also fine if possible to attach, like ‘child labor is a curse to our society and may our wisdom blossom to prevent it’. Some even suggest to attach a quotation of some great person like Newton or Lincoln or Gandhi, but do that only if you can remember it word to word But people say that it can give your score a edge, not sure, how true it is. I found the latter very difficult, so I never tried it.

    After finishing the writing of the task, if possible check it immediately, word to word, so that you can get rid of all possible mistakes you might have made in spelling, grammar, tense etc.

    The writing above is a clip of an individualized experience of the author of this article and has no relation with any official IELTS exam or its bodies. Please cross check issues that concern you from various competent authorities dealing with IELTS. This blog shouldn’t be used as a tool to prepare for any exam or test.
     
  • Sumanta 3:54 PM on January 29, 2014 Permalink |
    Tags: academic, , , Reading, Tips   

    TIPS for IELTS reading (academic) 

    Well this discussion is related to academic reading of IELTS.

    The academic reading section has a lot of myths related to it, specially about how to get a good score.

    Following are tips what the author found effective and thought sharing will be of worth :

    1. When you get the task it may be wise to look at the tasks and find out which section looks more simple, and one may start answering from that section. Because more correct answers matter for a good score, not which question.
    2. While reading the paragraphs a good habit may be to mark things that might be important like important dates, names of cities or persons etc. It helps when we skim the paragraphs latter on to find a specific answer.
    3. A big controversy which students discuss in regard to the reading test is, if one should read the whole text or not. Some say they just read the first line of each para of a section and can guess what the answers will be. While others say that reading the questions first helps to find the answers. See, which is effective method for you. What I found is certain paragraphs are easy to understand and can be dealt with reading the questions first, and not reading the whole text at first. However, that don’t look wise way to approach when we are dealing with paragraphs that are bit difficult. In case of the latter, reading all the  paragraphs in detail is the safest strategy, I believe.
    4. Time management in academic reading appears to be a big challenge.  It’s ideal to be fixed to the 2 minutes time allotted for the tasks.
    5. For better time management, leave questions that are difficult and come back to them at the end if you have some time left. although this sounds easy and a matter of common sense, it can become difficult in real testing situation. The time pressure can make things messy.
    6. Many perceive ‘yes’, ‘no’ and ‘not given’ type questions as difficult and confusing. When got stuck with them, specially the ‘not given once’, a healthy guess work might work. It’s better to guess since there is no negative marking.
    7. Another mistake that can happen when you are not attempting the reading passages in order, for example when you are choosing to answer the second passage before the first, don’t always expect the questions to be found only after where the passage finishes, a part of the questions can be at before the the passage too. So before and after reading the passage, try to check if you went all questions related to the passage.
    8. If possible practice daily. I found it as a skill which improves with regular practice, to learn techniques to handle the the task in limited time. Even a native English speaker probably can’t get a good score without practice, in my opinion the reading test is a type of aptitude test rather than language test.
    9. While copying alphabets like ‘a’ or ‘b’ or ‘c’ as an answer to a multiple choice question be cautious to write the correct letter on the answer sheet.
    10. Spelling is important so take care of it.
    11. Strong nerves help, when little time left and lot of questions are undone. Even you may not be able to complete all, attempts in calm mind may help get more questions right.
    The writing above is a clip of an individualized experience of the author of this article and has no relation with any official IELTS exam or its bodies. Please cross check issues that concern you from various competent authorities dealing with IELTS. This blog shouldn’t be used as a tool to prepare for any exam or test.
     
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